Sermons

Sermons

Luke 22:66-23:25 The Trials of Jesus and the Wisdom of the Crowds

Please turn with me to Luke, chapter 22, verse 66. We are in the home stretch of our series now. Four weeks left through the book of Luke. Last week, this week, and next we are in the darkest part of the story, the arrest, trial, and crucifixion. For those of us who love, trust, and worship Jesus, this part is confusing and painful.  It’s hard to sit through. To see our savior, blameless, innocent, righteous, powerful, wise, and good,…

Luke 22:1-38

SERMON POWERPOINT Sunday, July 31, 2022  Brad Barrett Luke 22:1-38 The Betrayal of the Son The setting from the text of Scriptures this morning is just hours before Jesus is crucified.  Brutally murdered.  A more unjust treatment the world has never seen. But it’s no surprise, for Jesus had previously told the disciples that this day was coming. Luke 9:22 ESV “The Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and chief priests and scribes,…

Luke 21 – The Coming Destruction

The past several weeks, we’ve been studying Luke’s account of Jesus’s entry to Jerusalem to finish his earthly mission. Luke focuses his narrative of this week on Jesus’s confrontation of the injustice, corruption, and error in the temple service and the elite religious leaders.  Today, we’re going to tackle one of the trickiest passages in this part of Luke, one of the trickiest passages in the whole book in fact.  Next Spring, we’re starting a series through Revelation. Today’s passage…

Luke 19:11-48 Do His Business Until He Comes

Have you ever wondered, “What is God’s will for me?” Just one week before he is crucified and resurrected, Jesus tells his followers in a parable what his will for them is after he ascends into heaven. He says, “Engage in my business until I come back,” and he promises great reward to all who do. This Sunday’s passage will look at this parable plus some other words from Jesus that may surprise us, pleasantly so.

The Devotional Life: College Panel

Recommended Resources The Spiritual Disciplines of the Christian Life – Don Whitney Habits of Grace – David Mathis A good reading Bible(s) New Morning Mercies – Paul Tripp (devotional) The Valley of Vision – Banner of Truth (prayer book) The New City Catechism and Paired Devotional – Crossway (app also available for free in the app store ) Every Moment Holy – Douglas McKelvey / Rabbit Room (prayers, liturgies, etc. for the daily life)

Luke 18:35-19:10 Salvation for the Outcast

Though few of us like to admit that we are weak and even lost, such an admission is a beautiful place to find intimacy, strength, and help from the God of all power and mercy. This Sunday we will look at two stories that will powerfully inspire us to humbly seek after our merciful Savior.

Luke 17:20-18:8 Like the Days of Noah and Lot

The Pharisees ask Jesus about the timing of the arrival of God’s Kingdom on earth that He has been talking about. Jesus response to this question in the gospels is always the same: No one can know the timing, but it will happen suddenly, without warning, that is, without further warning than the one he continually gives: be ready today. In our eating, drinking, getting married, buying, selling, planting, building, sleeping, and milling, are we also praying: “Lord let your kingdom come!”

Luke 16:1-17 – God’s Economics

This week, we’ll look at a perplexing parable about a master, a manager, and money. The details are confusing to our modern understanding of business, but Jesus’s message is clear nonetheless. The problem that Jesus was pointing out was that we, like the disciples and the Pharisees, don’t know what money is really for, and we forget who it really belongs to. When we see how Jesus uses this parable to instruct the disciples and rebuke the Pharisees, we’ll gain great insight into God’s economics. How does he want us to use “our” money?

Luke 24:13-27 – How Jesus Reveals Himself

After Jesus’s crucifixion and burial, even the apostles were devastated and confused, going only by what they could see. Their entire world was crashing around them, or so they thought. When Jesus finally does show up on that first Easter morning, the surprising ways he reveals himself to his despairing flock can teach us much about what we need from him today.

Luke 15 – Lost, But Now Found

Jesus was frequently accused of being friends with the worst sinners in society. The outcasts. The untouchables. And the accusations were true. So he opens wide the heart of God in an astonishing trio of parables, including his best known one, the Prodigal Son. This Sunday from Luke 15 we will seek to have hearts full of gratitude, for God has diligently and actively sought us out in the gospel story. And we will seek to have great joy, for God joyfully loves and welcomes us.

Luke 14:7-35 – The Way of a Disciple

The way of a disciple of Jesus—the life and heart of a disciple—is not intuitive due to our sinful tendencies and the world’s influences, but it is beautiful and glorious. This Sunday in our sermon we will examine Jesus’ surprising words as he calls us to be true disciples.

Luke 12:35-13:9 – Be Ready for the Master’s Return

In our passage this week, Jesus tells us to think forward to judgement day, The Day of The Lord, The Return of Christ, and teaches us something remarkable: Christians never need to fear death, because they never die. He confronts us with a question: Are you ready for that judgement day? Or are you living like it’s not coming?

Luke 12:13-34 – Be Heavenly Minded

The natural way to look at life is from a short-term, temporary view, and when this is connected to the topic of money, two outcomes result: greed and worry. In this passage from Luke 12, Jesus calls us to an eternal and heavenly-minded view that leads to something glorious: a contented and peace-filled life that centers its trust in our great God and Father.

Luke 11:37-54 – Woe to the Pharisees and Lawyers

In this week’s sermon, we look at a scene in which a question about washing up before a meal provokes a seemingly very harsh response from Jesus. But you stack up everything Luke has recorded the Pharisees and Lawyers saying so far in the gospel account, the response makes much more sense. Why does Jesus respond this way to the Pharisees? Because of the way they have been responding to the Messiah, and treating God’s children. We’ll look at ways we can be just like the Pharisees and Lawyers, and more importantly, we’ll look at our great savior who offers mercy, healing, forgiveness, and love.